Sharon and Ozzy Osbourne Featured in 'CBS's Cares Colonoscopy Sweepstakes' Campaign
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In Loving Memory of Willie Robinson: 8 years old and died of Cancer because of his parents' refusal to seek medical treatment
The Parents of Willie Robinson received 8 years for their failure to seek medical attention for their 8 year-old son who died of Hodgkins Lymphoma
Sharon and Ozzy Osbourne Featured in 'CBS's Cares Colonoscopy Sweepstakes' Campaign
CBS and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital are joining forces to increase awareness for colon cancer and promote early screening to help save lives by launching the second CBS Cares Colonoscopy Sweepstakes.

The 2012 CBS Cares Colonoscopy Sweepstakes launched last night during 60 Minutes with a PSA featuring colon cancer survivor and THE TALK host Sharon Osbourne, along with her husband, Ozzy. Alan Kalter, the announcer of "The Late Show with David Letterman", is also featured in the PSA.

To read the article, or for more information, Click Here.
The parents of an 8-year-old boy who died from Hodgkin lymphoma after suffering for months from undiagnosed swollen glands were sentenced to eight years in prison Thursday following their guilty pleas to denying him medical treatment.

The couple was given the maximum sentence by Cuyahoga County Judge Michael Astrab, who accepted their guilty pleas last month to attempted involuntary manslaughter in a last-minute plea deal before their trial was about to begin. They were handcuffed and taken into custody immediately. Both plan to appeal the sentence.

To read the full story, Click Here.
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The South Florida Cancer Association Brings You Information About Events Happening In Our Community
Lung Cancer Screening Clinic Open at Sylvester
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center has opened a Lung Cancer Screening Clinic to help identify lung cancer at its earliest stages, when patients have their best chance of survival.

The clinic, launched by surgical oncologists at Sylvester, opened for Floridians and international patients this month, lung cancer awareness month, and just as the National Comprehensive Cancer Network unveils its recommendations for lung cancer screening guidelines.

Lung cancer is the No. 1 cause of cancer death in the nation and the second leading cause of death from all causes. An estimated 250,000 Americans will be diagnosed with lung cancer in 2011 and 150,000 will die. In Florida alone, lung cancer will claim 10,000 lives.

There are enormous benefits to catching lung cancer early, says Tammy Baxter, M.D., assistant professor in the Department of Surgery and one of the leaders of the program. “Survival is three to four times higher if it’s caught very early. That means lives saved,” Dr. Baxter said.

Early detection of lung cancer leads to increased survival, but in many cases, a patient’s disease is not discovered until there are symptoms and it is in an advanced stage. Until now, there has been no method for lung cancer screening that was proven to be effective. A recent study, however, by the National Cancer Institute showed a 20 percent improvement in survival with screening by CT imaging.

Based on that evidence, Sylvester is taking a lead role in saving lives. Baxter, along with Dao M. Nguyen, M.D., the B. and Donald Carlin Chair in Thoracic Surgical Oncology, and Richard Thurer, M.D., professor of surgery, are heading up the Sylvester screening program in anticipation of national guidelines being issued.

For more information you may Click Here, or, to schedule a screening, please call the Ask for Ana program at Sylvester at 305-243-5302 or 1-877-243-1056.
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center
Obesity and Cancer Screening: Does Race and Gender Also Play a Role?
Researchers in Family and Community Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University recently found that obesity was linked to higher rates of prostate cancer screening across all races/ethnic differences and lower rates of cervical cancer screening, most notably in white women. Their study on the role of obesity in cancer screening rates for prostate, cervical as well as breast and colorectal cancers across race/ethnicity and gender is examined in the current issue of the Journal of Obesity.

Obesity is second only to tobacco use as a risk factor for cancer and is associated with increased mortality for all cancer combined as well as for cancer of specific sites, including cancer of the colon/rectum, prostate, breast, and cervix.

To read more about this study, Click Here.
The South Florida Cancer Association Provides the Latest News on Cancer!
The South Florida Cancer Association Provides the Latest News on Cancer!
The South Florida Cancer Association Provides the Latest News on Cancer!
The South Florida Cancer Association Provides the Latest News on Cancer!
The South Florida Cancer Association Provides the Latest News on Cancer!
The South Florida Cancer Association Provides the Latest News on Cancer!
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